Ten Rivers that Shaped the World by Marilee Peters and Kim Rosen

Ten Rivers that Shaped the World by Marilee Peters and Kim Rosen (Annick Press, Aprill 2015) is a delightful children’s nonfiction book about the significance of ten rivers on the history of the world. The rivers chosen are not necessarily the most infuential or the most interesting, but together the histories provide a well-rounded overview of world history and impact of rivers on the development of history.

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Teaching Kids to Think by Darlene Sweetland and Ron Stolberg

At first, I thought Teaching Kids to Think by Darlene Sweetland and Ron Stolberg (Sourcebooks, March 2015) had a deceptive title. I had thought it would be  about helping kids learn and logic through academics. Rather, Teaching Kids to Think is focused on helping parents raise children that think through the basics of everyday survival and life, emphasizing confidence, independence, and thoughtfulness during the everyday simple (and not-so-simple) decisions of sociability in this world. Truly, this type of “thinking” is the basis of any success in academics!

After reading the book, I can only say that this The book that parents needs in order to help a child succeed in school, business, or everyday socialization. How can our kids learn to work in a workplace if the basics that Drs. Sweetland and Stolberg emphasize are not learned at a young age?

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Dragonflies by Pieter van Dokkum

Dragonfiles by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University Press, March 2015) is a gorgeous coffee table book about dragonflies. I admit, that, since I am not a scientific person, I wondered about this book. I have never once thought about dragonflies nor wondered how they develop, live, and eat. However, the gorgeous image on the cover with promises of more drew me in to the book. The text is not overbearing, and the photographs kept me turning pages.

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The Mormon Tabernacle Choir by Michael Hicks

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir by Michael Hicks (University of Illinois Press, March 2015) is a biography of the choir itself. As a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I’ve grown up with the choir: songs during the biannual general conferences, recordings in my home. Because of my background, I was interested in learning more about the history of the choir.

I found the book to be an interesting read, although I felt a bit overwhelmed and lost at times. I don’t know why. The book clearly followed the choir chronologically from its founding to its current status. Maybe it was a lack of personality in the narrative as it covered the historical events and changing patterns of the choir. Maybe it was simply my frame of mind as I read it. I cannot say that this book was a favorite, but I feel I have a little bit better understanding of the role and significance of the choir to the Church. I am glad that I read the book.

Note: I received a digital copy of the book for review consideration.