50 in 5 (Classics Club)

I hope to read the following 50 books by February 22, 2017. If I finish early, which I hope I do, I get to make a list of 50 books to reread! See also my introductory post to the project.

Progress: 9/50

Ancient

  1. Gilgamesh
  2. Grief Lessons (Four plays by Euripides, as translated by Anne Carlson)
  3. Three Theban Plays by Sophocles
  4. Oresteia Trilogy (also including Seven Against Thebes and Prometheus Bound) by Aeschylus
  5. The Republic by Plato
  6. The Aeneid by Virgil
  7.  If Not, Winter by Sappho (fragments, translated by Anne Carlson)  thoughts

Medieval

  1. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

Non-Western Early Classics

  1. The Tale of the Genji by Murasaki

Pre-Victorian England

  1. Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott
  2. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley   thoughts

Victorian

  1. Lady Audley’s Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon
  2. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte
  3. Villette by Charlotte Bronte
  4. Poor Miss Finch by Wilkie Collins thoughts
  5. Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
  6. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  7. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens
  8. Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens
  9. Adam Bede by George Eliot
  10. Daniel Deronda by George Eliot
  11. Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell
  12. The Life of Charlotte Bronte by Elizabeth Gaskell
  13. The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy
  14. Vanity Fair by William Thackeray  thoughts

American Classics

  1. The Awakening by Kate Chopin thoughts
  2. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper thoughts
  3. The Wings of the Dove by Henry James
  4. Iola Leroy by Frances Harper
  5. The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois

Classics in Translation

  1. The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal
  2. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
  3. Hedda Gabler by Henrick Ibsen
  4. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
  5. The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov (play)
  6. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  7. Suite Francaisse by Irene Nemirovsky
  8. Letters from a Young Poet by Ranier Maria Rilke
  9. The Growth of the Soil by Knut Hamsun

Twentieth-Century Classics

  1. Kim by Rudyard Kipling (1907)
  2. A Room with a View by E.M. Foster (1908)
  3. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw (1912)
  4. Main Street by Sinclair Lewis (1920)
  5. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (1929) thoughts
  6. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1929) thoughts
  7. The Waves by Virginia Woolf (1931)
  8. Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1934)  thoughts
  9. Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh (1945)
  10. The Bridge on the Drina by Ivo Andric (1945)
  11. All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren (1947)

 

6 Responses

  1. Jillian
    Jillian March 22, 2012 at 7:30 am |

    Yay! I was hoping you’d join. (I’ll add the rest of my thoughts in the comment where you announce the club. This is just to welcome you!)

  2. Beth DiIorio
    Beth DiIorio March 22, 2012 at 11:36 am |

    Wow…your classics list has great variety! The Old Curiosity Shop is a title on my list, too, and I can’t wait to read it (the title and blurb hooked me). Enjoy!
    Beth

  3. Katrina
    Katrina March 22, 2012 at 6:25 pm |

    Great list. I think we only share two of the same books (The Republic and Ivanhoe) but we have lots of the same authors in common.

    1. Rebecca Reid
      Rebecca Reid March 31, 2012 at 10:37 pm |

      Katrina, I’ve already read some of the more common choices for some of these authors, so I look forward to revisiting them with their other novels! Happy reading!

  4. Angus
    Angus March 28, 2012 at 12:18 am |

    WOW! I love the fact that you included Hamsun’s Growth of the Soil. A popular choice would have been Hunger. I can’t wait to hear your thoughts on it. :)

    1. Rebecca Reid
      Rebecca Reid March 31, 2012 at 10:39 pm |

      Angus, I really loved reading HUNGER so I’ve been eager to try another Hamsun novel. My list was intended to be NEW books to me, not ones I’ve already read. But I agree, HUNGER was a great place to start for Hamsun. I’m hoping GROWTH OF THE SOIL is also fantastic. Have you read it?

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