My grandfather was born in Hreljin in 1923, when it was Yugoslavia and in what is now Croatia. When I heard about Yugoslavian Ivo Andric’s 1945 novel The Bridge on the Drina, I had hoped for a glimpse of what life was like in my ancestor’s homeland during a tumultuous time. Although my grandfather’s home

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It’s Book Blogger Appreciation Week and I really appreciate you! Thanks for reading and appreciating the classics with me! For this giveaway, I am sending a gently used book  from my shelf (a double copy), and I will send it anywhere in the world. The Portrait of a Lady, by Henry James is often considered

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Thornton Wilder’s sparse and simple play Our Town was first produced during the Great Depression (1938). In a set without any scenery beyond chairs and tables and in three short acts, Thornton Wilder creates an intimacy with the characters. This is probably due to the familiarity of the subject: life, love, and death in a

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So I have been a bit out of the loop this week due to a busy schedule and well, just not being organized enough to blog. But. I happened to notice that there is a Literary Giveaway Blog Hop going on this week (see Leeswammes’ Blog for other participants). I’m too late to sign up

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Although Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is a slim book (124 pages), the issues raised are relevant today. I wouldn’t say Gilman’s writing is stunning or beautiful. The plot is not engaging or page-turning. It is predictable and overly “convenient.” The characters are stereotypes on steroids. But rather than expecting any of those other things,

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