With the silly concept of rating things in life according to a five-star scale, The Anthropocene Reviewed by John Green (Dutton, 2021) combines the author’s thoughts about humankind, our influence on the world, and the world’s changing influence on each of us in a collection essays. The essays range from somewhat silly to insightful. As

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Oh books! How I love thee! If you have ever purchased a physical book because of its cover or because it will nicely match the books already on your shelf, then The Clothing of Books by Jhumpa Lahiri (published in the US with Vintage Books, 2016) will be a delight for you, as it was

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Writers and Their Teachers edited by Dale Salwak (Bloomsbury, May 2023) is an enlightening collection of essays by 20 different world-renowned authors, delving into the influential figures who shaped their writing journeys. The book gives a diverse range of perspectives, allowing for an anthology that many will enjoy reading. The anthology contains contributions from twenty

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This post is a part of the Ancient Greeks Classics Circuit. See the other stops on the tour here.  Aristotle’s own Poetics was a nice introduction to my self-imposed classics unit on Ancient Greek theater. I choose to read Poetics was my chosen text to read by the man himself, mostly because it’s the shortest but also because I am

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Last week I reread Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal: For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland from Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public as a part of the Martel-Harper Challenge. While I was well aware that Jonathan Swift’s short essay is classic satire,

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