As the title suggests, Fungi Grow by Maria Gianferrari (illustrated by Diana Sudyka; Beach Lane Books, 2023) is a nonfiction picture book focusing on the growth, spread, and purpose of fungi through the world. With realistic illustrations, a variety of fonts, and both a storyline and sidebar facts, this picture book provides a welcome and

Read Post

Because of an Acorn by Lola and Adam Schaefer (Chronicle Books, 2016; illustrated by Fran Preston-Gannon) has pretty pictures and simple text to show the connection between an acorn growing and the other types of life surrounding it. Birds, fruit, deer, chipmunks, and other animals all are able to live. They also contribute to adding

Read Post

The nonfiction picture book My Light by Molly Bang (Blue Sky Press, 2004) is narrated by the sun and covers many topics in elementary science. The influence of the sun is woven into explanations about the power of the great star into the water cycle and so much more. The water’s movement and the warm

Read Post

Just as in another book in the series that I read, Bethany Barton’s I’m Trying to Love Germs (Viking Books, 2023) is a story told in alternating voices, this time between a human and a microscopic germ, this time teaching the reader basic facts about microorganisms. It includes interactive elements, such as “just move your

Read Post

Many: The Diversity of Life on Earth by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Emily Sutton (Candlewick, 2020) is a gloriously illustrated book has a nice balance of illustration to detailed factual text. It teaches about the variety of life on earth, including animals, plants, fungi, and microbes. Italicized sidebars also expand upon the read-aloud text with

Read Post

It must be difficult to write a nonfiction book for young children that will both instruct and keep a child engaged in continuing to read. Germs by John Devolle (Pushkin Press, June 2023) is a nonfiction picture book that nicely balances facts with humor and amusing bright geometric illustrations. I was amazed at the amount

Read Post

As the title indicates, How Birds Sleep by David Obuchowski, illustrated by Sarah Pedry (mineditionUS, March 2023) teaches how nearly two dozen bird species sleep. The tone of the text sounds like a bedtime book, and it has a frame of a barn owl waking just as the animals are ready for sleep. Then, at

Read Post

We’re entering an era where the beginning of COVID-19 is actually a part of history, which feels incredibly weird to me. Nevertheless, it’s clear that the world’s success in overcoming the dangerous beginning stages of the virus was in motion long before the virus showed up. In Never Give Up by Debbie Dadey, illustrated by

Read Post

Jadav Payeng was just a boy when he mourned for the snakes and other animals that were swept onto small dry island in the middle of the river during the monsoon season. The sandbars were bare, so when the waters receded, the snakes dried in the hot northeastern Indian sun. Though he didn’t know it,

Read Post

For anyone seeking to supplement an ocean animals study with learning about the animals of the Maria Trench, you don’t need to look any further than Deep, Deep Down by Lydia Lukidis, illustrated by Juan Calle (Capstone, 2023). This nonfiction poetic picture book does a wonderful job of matching its intended audience with tone, text,

Read Post