The picture book We are Fungi by Christina Nishiyama (Might Cold Studios, 2017) shows various types of fungi in the wild, told from the perspective of a group of fungi. Lots of information is given in these “we” statements. The illustrations show a child going through a forest with a dog, and labels appear wherever

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Karl, Get Out of the Garden! by Anita Sanchez (illustrated by Catherine Stock; Charlesbridge, 2017) is a picture book biography of Carolus Linneas, the first to set up the a systematic way of classifying living things by giving each thing a scientific name. Carolus Linneaus is the Latin version of Karl Linne, a scientist who

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With a child-friendly tone, Volcano Dreams: A Story of Yellowstone by Janet Fox (illustrated by Marlo Garnsworthy; Web of Life, 2018) introduces a variety of creatures that live in Yellowstone National Park, as well as personifies the geological features of the park, such as geysers and bubbling hot springs. The only one sleeping is the

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With a focus on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, The Coral Kingdom by Laura Knowles (illustrated by Jennie Webber; words and pictures, 2018) introduces the basic animals of the coral reef with the colorful coral reef ecosystem as the highlight of the picture book’s pages. Rhyming couplets on each page help make the text

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Earthquakes by Ellen J. Prager (illustrated by Susan Greenstein; National Geographic Kids, 2017; Jump into Science! series) is an illustrated nonfiction picture book that teaches about earthquakes in a child-friendly way. Cartoon illustrations, maps, and diagrams make the book easy to approach. By asking questions, the book encourages the reader to consider before they continue

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The fictionalized nonfiction picture book On Kiki’s Reef by Carol L. Malnor (illustrated by Trina L. Hunner; Dawn Publications, 2014) tells about the life cycle and habitat of a sea turtle named Kiki in the coral reef habitat. Parallel text appears on each page: one provides details about Kiki’s life (in a serif font), and

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The nonfiction picture book, Old Enough to Save the Planet by Loll Kirby (illustrated by Adelina Lirius; Harry Abrams, 2021) shows how kids can help our environment. Each two-page spread highlights a real child that made a difference in his or her community by noticing an issue and starting an initiative for change. The top

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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann (Knopf, 2011) details the ecological and human impact of the Columbian exchange. As a dense book full of research carefully explained and expanded, 1493 was certainly not a book I “galloped” through, as one of the historian commentators exclaims on the back cover. But

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Fungus is Among Us! by Joy Keller (Innovation Press, 2019) has a fictional and rhyming story-line that follows a girl walking in a forest and through her home. Throughout her walk, she learns about all the fungus that is in her life. This includes mushrooms, moss, mold on old food and on shower walls (ewwww).

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